<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000">
    On 10/29/2014 01:54 PM, bob wole via USRP-users wrote:
    <blockquote
cite="mid:CAGd3OzypzRwVt7REqxmMSyMG6jtvazmAGahuQ99uXKzMNY2FHA@mail.gmail.com"
      type="cite">
      <div dir="ltr">
        <div><br>
        </div>
        <div>USRPN210r4 with SBX</div>
        <div><br>
        </div>
        <div>I am observing a strong spike at the center of the receive
          spectrum when I start burst transmission.</div>
        <div><br>
        </div>
        <div>My top flowgraph contains following two hierarchical blocks</div>
        <div> 1) A transmitter flow graph with (tx_time, tx_sob, tx_eob)</div>
        <div> 2) A receiver flow graph </div>
        <div><br>
        </div>
        <div>When I run top flowgrpah (without transmitting anything)
          and observe the FFT of the received signal the spectrum does
          not contain high spike in the center.</div>
        <div><br>
        </div>
        <div>But as soon as I start transmitting in burst mode I see a
          very high spike in center of the received signal FFT spectrum.
          It looks like LO (transmitter or receiver ) is being received?
          Which one is it ? And why is it happening?  How can I avoid it
          because it is affecting my packets. </div>
        <div><br>
        </div>
        <div>When I apply the offset in digital using DDC/DUC, the spike
          moves out of the band. </div>
        <div><br>
        </div>
        <div><br>
        </div>
        <div>--</div>
        <div>Bob</div>
      </div>
      <pre wrap="">
<fieldset class="mimeAttachmentHeader"></fieldset>
_______________________________________________
USRP-users mailing list
<a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="mailto:USRP-users@lists.ettus.com">USRP-users@lists.ettus.com</a>
<a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://lists.ettus.com/mailman/listinfo/usrp-users_lists.ettus.com">http://lists.ettus.com/mailman/listinfo/usrp-users_lists.ettus.com</a>
</pre>
    </blockquote>
    That spike in the middle is a consequence of using direct conversion
    in both the RX and TX paths--it'll be there in both to some degree.<br>
    <br>
    You can use offset-tuning to move the DC offset outside your
    passband:<br>
    <br>
    <a href="http://files.ettus.com/manual/page_general.html">http://files.ettus.com/manual/page_general.html</a><br>
    <br>
    <br>
    In built-for-a-particular-purpose radios, there will also be
    undesired LO leakage and mixing products--those are generally dealt
    with using an<br>
      application/band-specific filter to eliminate them.  For
    general-purpose SDRs, that isn't possible to do "as manufactured",
    you have to deal<br>
      with RF hygiene and plumbing issues yourself.<br>
    <br>
    So, moving the LO leakage outside your passband is part of the
    picture--use offset tuning for that.  Then, if you have "this won't
    meet<br>
      our hygiene requirements", you have to look at filtering.<br>
    <br>
    Another thing you really should do is to run the calibration
    utilities, which will attempt to balance I/Q amplitude and phase,
    which can improve<br>
      some of these issues, but not, usually, eliminate them entirely.<br>
    <br>
    <br>
    <pre class="moz-signature" cols="72">-- 
Marcus Leech
Principal Investigator
Shirleys Bay Radio Astronomy Consortium
<a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://www.sbrac.org">http://www.sbrac.org</a>
</pre>
  </body>
</html>